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The Confident Rookie Series: Secret 5, Cheerfully Waste Your Time

Written by Jennifer Allan on Tuesday, 15 September 2009 7:00 pm
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Welcome back to the Confident Rookie Series, ten secrets to help new or newer real estate agents get up to speed and earning a paycheck before they risk becoming just another real estate statistic. This week we'll discuss why it's okay, even advisable, to cheerfully waste your time!

Regular readers of my blog know how I feel about wasting time. I'm all for it! Especially for rookies. This is one of the main reasons I advise against jumping into the business only half-way (that is, part time) when you have to carefully guard your time, you can't risk "wasting" any of it, and that's a shame.

Even experienced agents should be willing to cheerfully "waste their time" every chance they get, but it's critical for rookies.

What, exactly, does it mean to "cheerfully waste your time?"

It means that you take every opportunity to be out there in the world talking about or looking at or learning more about real estate. If you are doing something that accomplishes one of these items, that's time well-spent, even if the activity is not leading you directly to a paycheck. Not only are you learning more about being a real estate agent, you're also putting yourself in front of people who could end up being your biggest fans.

When you're new, take every opportunity to learn something, even if it takes time, even if it takes gas. Think about it. Would you rather practice on someone who may NOT buy or sell right away, or someone who will? Sure, on the surface, you'd rather work with someone who is leading you to a paycheck, but there's certainly a strong argument for perfecting your technique on non-clients first!

Some "time-wasters" to embrace:

  • Showing an office listing to an already-represented buyer who calls off the For Sale sign?

  • Helping a friend protest her tax assessment by providing sold data?

  • Helping a friend protest a low appraisal for a refinance?

  • Preparing a listing presentation and CMA for a potential seller when you're pretty sure he isn't going to hire you?

  • Showing homes to a buyer who can't yet qualify to buy a home, but thinks he can in six months?

  • Helping a relocating renter identify the right neighborhood for her?

All of these activities teach you more about your market and give you practice communicating market data to potential clients. They also give you an opportunity to impress someone who might end up being your biggest client and/or referral source. Doesn't that sound like an excellent use of time?

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