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How to Use Pantone's Two Colors of The Year in Your Home

Written by Jaymi Naciri on Sunday, 06 December 2015 10:14 am

It's a girl! And a boy!

Yes, Pantone, the harbinger of color trends, has given birth to two colors of the year from 2016: Rose Quartz and Serenity, otherwise known as baby pink and baby blue.

It's the first time Pantone has chosen two colors for its annual distinction.

"As consumers seek mindfulness and well-being as an antidote to modern day stresses, welcoming colors that psychologically fulfill our yearning for reassurance and security are becoming more prominent. Joined together, Rose Quartz and Serenity demonstrate an inherent balance between a warmer embracing rose tone and the cooler tranquil blue, reflecting connection and wellness as well as a soothing sense of order and peace," said Pantone in its statement naming the two colors of the year.

Los Angeles interior designer Timothy Corrigan said in the L.A Times said, "The choices represent a welcome change. People are ready for softer colors. They are moving away from the strong bold colors and geometric patterns that have been popular over the past few years. There is a return to comfort and innocence."

But there's more behind this year's color choices.

"The prevalent combination of Rose Quartz and Serenity also challenges traditional perceptions of color association. In many parts of the world we are experiencing a gender blur as it relates to fashion, which has in turn impacted color trends throughout all other areas of design," they said. "This more unilateral approach to color is coinciding with societal movements toward gender equality and fluidity, the consumer's increased comfort with using color as a form of expression, a generation that has less concern about being typecast or judged and an open exchange of digital information that has opened our eyes to different approaches to color usage."

Designers and people who like to stay on the forefront of interior trends wait for Pantone's announcement every year to kick off their 2016 looks. Ready to get your new color on? Here are a few ways to use each in your home.

Decorating with Rose Quartz

"Rose Quartz is a persuasive yet gentle tone that conveys compassion and a sense of composure," said Pantone.

Rose Quartz and complementary shades of pink and gray create a glamorous bedroom.

The Decorista

The color sets an elegant tone in this dining room, with goldtone lighting providing an added level of luxe.

Room Décor Ideas

A decadent piece of furniture in the hue, like this curvy Haute House Pantages Chair, adds interest.


Varying shades of pink and a shock of acid green bring a richness to the space.


Gray and deep blue bring out the elegance of Rose Quartz, realized in striking artwork.


Or, embrace your love of pastels and go all out with baby pink walls and a mint green couch. (And don't forget the shag rug.)

Oscar Jetson

Yes, it's a baby's room (we couldn't resist!). But what stands out in this space is the pink wainscoting. Are you bold enough to use this in a formal dining room, perhaps?

Decorating with Serenity

"Serenity is weightless and airy, like the expanse of the blue sky above us, bringing feelings of respite and relaxation even in turbulent times," said Pantone.

Used as wall color, it creates a peaceful tone and sets the foundation for complementary hues.


It's especially effective when set off by all the chunky white molding.


Serenity works across many types of architectural styles, including Scandinavian design.


In a bedroom, light blue walls set against black furniture create an elegant feel.

Home Office Decoration

Adding color to the island brings interest and subtle contrast to an all-white kitchen.


Who says baby blue can't be bold? Using it on almost every surface gives it stature.


In a room with white walls and punches of bright color, the baby blue couch almost acts like a neutral.


Blue-hued glass on this standout light fixture brings in multiple trends at once.

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