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Monday, 14 October 2019
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4G LTE Signal Boosters : What You Need To Know

Written by Posted On Saturday, 26 August 2017 02:09

If the starting signal inside your home is better than -80 dBm on a 3G network or better than -70 dBm for a 4G network, chances are a signal booster is not going to help you because you are already getting the best possible performance your tower can offer. Likewise, if you do not see a noticeable increase in data speeds from your "in-home" speedtest results and your "outside-home" speedtest results a signal booster is not likely to help because your poor performance is not signal level related, it is cell tower/carrier network related.

hinking about purchasing a dual band cell phone signal booster but not sure about how 4G will fit into the picture? Because almost all commercially sold dual band cell phone signal boosters today work in the 850 and 1900 MHz range, they will not work with emerging 4G LTE or WiMAX technologies, which are 700 MHz (Verizon 4G and eventually AT&T 4G) and 2.5GHz (Sprint 4G) respectively. They will also not work with the AWS 1700MHZ and 2100MHz frequencies used by T-Mobile 3/4G. However, here are some points to consider if you're thinking about purchasing a cell phone signal booster but are on the fence about how 4G fits into the picture:

4G and the new frequency bands will be used mostly for data, with voice still being transmitted in the 850MHz or 1900MHz range. If you use your phone as a phone and don't have a data plan or use Wi-Fi for data, you don't have to worry about the booster not working or becoming obsolete. This may not be the case with all carriers so it is best to call your carrier and see what frequencies they use for voice in your specific area.


4G is not compatible with 3G or older phones. You will need to purchase a new phone if you plan on taking advantage of 4G data speeds. However, 4G phones will be backwards compatible with 3G networks, so if you travel outside of your 4G city you will still have access to 3G data speeds.


Slow 4G rollout. According to Verizon's website, they do not plan on having 4G coverage to match their existing 3G coverage for another 3 years. If you live in a rural area and don't currently have 3G coverage, you shouldn't expect 4G coverage for at least another 2 - 3 years if at all. AT&T is still focusing on upgrading its 3G network and does not plan on rolling out 4G LTE until sometime in 2011, and just like with Verizon, you'd better plan on waiting a while longer if you don't live in a major metropolitan area.


Limited 4G phone selection. Most of the demand for 4G is coming from businesses, not consumers. With that in mind, carriers will be focusing on developing reliable 4G laptop solutions before focusing on affordable 4G phones for consumers. Expect maybe 1 or 2 phone models per carrier to choose from until 4G has been fully deployed.

AT&T

AT&T's voice ( 2G), 3G and HSPA+ (4G) networks operate on 850 or 1900 MHz across the United States. So if you are just looking to boost these technologies, a traditional dual band cell phone signal booster will suffice. It is important to note that HSPA+ or High Speed Packet Access Plus is AT&T's 3G network with enhanced backhaul that has been marketed as 4G. It is not 4G LTE, which has been a source of confusion for many of our customers. If your phone, tablet, MiFi, etc. shows "4G" next to the signal bars, then you are on the HSPA+ network. If your phone, tablet, MiFi, etc. shows "LTE" next to the signal bars then you are on the LTE network. AT&T 4G LTE runs on the 700 MHz band on bands 4 and 17. It is important to note that AT&T 4G LTE is for data only. Phone calls and text messages are still transmitted on the 850 or 1900 MHz band. So, if you're looking to boost AT&T 4G LTE data only, look for a booster labeled specifically for AT&T 4G LTE. If you need to boost voice, 2G, 3G, 4G and AT&T 4G LTE data then you will need to look for an AT&T Tri-Band booster which supports 850 MHz, 1900 MHz, and 700 MHz bands 4 and 17 (AT&T 4G LTE).

Verizon

Verizon's voice (2G) and 3G (EVDO) networks operate on 850 or 1900 MHz across the United States. In most states, 850 MHz is used for voice and 1900 MHz is used for data. If you are just looking to boost voice calls, text messages and 3G data, look no further than a traditional dual band cell phone signal booster. Verizon 4G LTE, like AT&T 4G LTE, operates in 700 MHz spectrum, but on band 13. Just as with AT&T, if you're looking to boost Verizon 4G LTE data only, look for a booster made specifically for Verizon 4G LTE. If you need to boost, voice, 3G, and 4G LTE data you will need to look for a Verizon Tri-Band booster which supports 850 MHz, 1900 MHz, and 700 MHz band 13 (Verizon 4G LTE).

Sprint

Sprint's 2G and 3G networks on the traditional dual band frequencies nationwide, although mostly 1900 MHz. It is increasingly difficult to find a PCS only residential booster, so your best bet is a traditional dual band booster. Sprint's first generation of 4G ran in the Wimax band (2.5 GHz) and is still widely deployed. Recently, Sprint has launched its 4G LTE network which runs on a mix of Wimax and 1900 MHz, and soon, a part of the 800 band, which was previously dedicated for Nextel/iDEN. Your best bet for Sprint 4G data at this time is to call customer service and ask which frequencies they are using in your area for the technology you are interested in boosting. If Wimax is used in your area, a Sprint 4G Wimax booster is what you need. There are currently no boosters on the market for Sprint 4G LTE which will initially be deployed on the G block of the 1900 MHz Spectrum.

T-Mobile

T-Mobile runs on 1900 MHz for voice, 2G, and text messaging. Again, with it being hard to find a quality residential PCS only cell phone signal booster, a dual band booster is the way to go. T-Mobile's 3G and 4G HSPA+ networks run on the AWS or Advanced Wireless Services band (1700MHz / 2100 MHz) but are in the process of being transitioned to the 1900 MHz band to make way for their LTE network, which will operate on the AWS band. At the time of this writing, choose a dual band booster for voice and 2G data. If you're looking to boost 3 or 4G data, it is best to call customer service to see which spectrum is being used for 3 or 4G data in your area before purchasing a booster. Like with the other major carriers, boosting 3 or 4G AWS data will require a booster specifically labeled for AWS. If you are lucky enough to live in an area where T-Mobile has already transitioned their 3 and 4G networks to 1900 MHz, a traditional dual band booster will now work for not only voice and 2G data, but 3 and 4G data as well. If you're looking for a booster which will cover everything T-Mobile has to offer (including 4G LTE), no matter where you live or what frequencies are in use, you will want to look at a T-Mobile Tri-Band booster.

MetroPCS

MetroPCS uses 1900 MHz for voice calls. Some of their 3G service is offered on 1900 MHz while in some areas it runs on the AWS band (1700/2100 MHz). The AWS band is also used for their 4G LTE network. If looking to boost Metro PCS voice only, a traditional dual band booster will work. If looking to boost 3G data, it is best to call customer service first to find out what frequency they are using for your area. If looking to boost MetroPCS 4G LTE, you will need an AWS booster. If you're looking for a booster which will cover everything MetroPCS has to offer (including 4G LTE), no matter where you live or what frequencies are in use, you will want to look at a Tri-Band booster which includes 850/1900 and AWS frequencies.

Cricket Wireless

Cricket uses 1900 MHz for voice calls. Cricket's 3G data service utilizes the Sprint 3G CDMA network. So, if looking to boost voice and 3G data for Cricket, a traditional dual band booster is all that is needed. Cricket also owns some AWS spectrum on which they offer their 4G LTE service. If looking to boost Cricket 4G LTE you will need an AWS booster.

please check out, If you would like to learn more about 4G LTE Signal Boosters

 

Listing Additional Info

  • State: New Jersey
  • Address: 1295 West Side Avenue
  • City: Piscataway
  • Zipcode: 08854
  • SOLD: no
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