Sunday, 05 April 2020

a legal agreement by which a bank or other creditor lends money at interest in exchange for taking title of the debtor's property, with the condition that the conveyance of title becomes void upon the payment of the debt.

 

An offer to buy submitted to a seller with the understanding that the seller has already accepted a prior offer; a secondary offer.

A statement denying legal responsibility, frequently found in the form of the statement, “There are no promises, representations, oral understandings, or agreements except as contained herein.” Such a statement, however, would not relieve the maker of any liabilities for fraudulent acts or misrepresentations. Also called an exoneration clause or exculpatory clause.

mort•gage
noun

a legal agreement by which a bank or other creditor lends money at interest in exchange for taking title of the debtor's property, with the condition that the conveyance of title becomes void upon the payment of the debt.

 

An offer to buy submitted to a seller with the understanding that the seller has already accepted a
prior offer; a secondary offer.

A statement denying legal responsibility, frequently found in the form of the statement, “There are no promises, representations, oral understandings, or agreements except as contained herein.” Such a statement, however, would not relieve the maker of any liabilities for fraudulent acts or misrepresentations. Also called an exoneration clause or exculpatory clause.

A rule of agency law stipulating that when a contract is required by law to be in writing, the authority of an agent to enter into such a contract on behalf of the principal must also be in writing.

Provides confirmation by the tenant of the terms of the rental agreement, such as the amount of rent, the amount of security deposit and the expiration of the agreement. Further, the estoppel certificate may give the opportunity to the tenant to explain if she may have any claims against the landlord, which may affect a buyer's or lender's decision to complete the proposed transaction.

A fee paid to someone for producing either a buyer to purchase or a seller to list property; also called a referral fee. A finder is a person who finds, interests, introduces, or brings together parties in a deal, even though the finder has no part in negotiating the terms of the transaction.

Some words have multiple meanings:

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