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Because It's Ugly, and 3 Other Big Reasons Your Home Isn't Selling

Written by Jaymi Naciri on Wednesday, 19 February 2014 12:25 pm
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Ever wonder why some homes sell and others don't? There is no magical fairy dust that can turn a loser of a house into a palace. And, in fact, if there were such a think as magical fairy dust, sprinkling it in your home would make a big mess, and that's a big no-no if you want to sell.

Getting your home sold is not all that hard if you stick to the basics. But if you've got some of the problems below, you may just be sitting on that unsellable home for a while.

Problem No. 1: Because your home is ugly

Yes, your home is ugly. If your Realtor didn't tell you that, let us go ahead and say what he should have. And just so we're clear, "ugly" can also stand in for:

Cluttered
Outdated
Dirty
Messy
Tacky

Very few people - investors looking for a deal aside - can walk into an untidy mess of a house and see the potential. If you're not willing to clean it up, clean it out, and maybe make a few overdue updates, you may not get it sold. That goes double for over-personalization that is so in your face buyers can't see past it.

"Everybody's taste is different, so less is more when it comes to decor at sale time. Loud patterns and bold colors can be big distractions," said MSN.

Solution:

You need to de-ugly-fy that house but quick. Pretty places around you are selling. If you have similar plans, similar features, similar lots and they're selling while you're sitting, it's not hard to figure out why.

Take a good long look. If you don't see anything wrong, bring in a few friends for their opinions. But only the ones who might actually tell you the truth.

Dirty Kitchen

Problem No. 2. Because your price is unrealistic

This is the No. 1 most common problem with homes that are not selling, says MSN. "If you're guilty of having "a 'what the heck are they thinking?' price tag," they say, you can expect to sit on the market for a while.

"Price is usually the overriding factor in any home that doesn't sell. Whatever its problem, it can usually be rectified by adjusting the price."

Adds U.S. News: "Without question, the No. 1 reason a home doesn't sell is price. Sellers have an emotional attachment to their homes and tend not to be objective about the true value."

Solution:

If it is an emotional attachment that's getting in the way, take the emotion out of the equation and think of it simply as a business transaction. Many times the issue is a seller owes more than the home is worth or simply wants a higher price. But it's the market that sets the price. And if it's telling you your price is too high, it's probably best to listen.

When all else fails, listen to your agent, who should have provided you with comparables that spell out recent sales and market trends. (Also See: It's The Price That Sells a Home)

Problem No. 3: Because it's a 'project' house

Maybe you've made the decision to sell and you just don't want to put any money into a house that's no longer going to be yours. But a house that looks like it's going to take too much work - or too much money - to fix up is a turnoff.

"If a home looks as if it's going to cost half as much to repair or renovate as it does to purchase, it's going to take a long time to move," said MSN. "Today's buyer is a lot more reluctant to take on a 'project,' especially if there are houses around it that don't need as much work. Ditto for homes that have strong pet or mold smells."

The Solution:

"Fix it, or prepare to lop a large amount off the price," said MSN.

Problem No. 4: Because you're not cooperating

This is also the No. 1 reason houses end up overpriced. Uncooperative sellers also tend to ignore other advice from their agent, about keeping the home tidy (see No. 1), being available when needed, being open to price reductions, being able to make the house available for open houses, and agreeing to terms when there is a contract discussion.

"No offense, but maybe you aren't showing your house off enough? If you aren't using a real estate agent and work away from your home, your time might be limited, of course. But you should try to make your house as accessible and available as possible for a Realtor and a potential homebuyer to easily drop by and take a tour (which means having the place clean, too)," said U.S. News. "Having your home be shown only by appointment or only at designated times will severely cut down on the number of showings you get, and if the house isn't getting shown, it isn't going to get sold."

The Solution:

Get in or get out. Or get in to get out. You have to commit yourself to a process that, quite frankly, can be inconvenient and a hassle in order to get your home sold, especially in more competitive markets. Being agreeable and available, however painful, for this finite amount of time, will pay off in the end.

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1 comment

  • Comment Link Bon Ellingboe Thursday, 27 February 2014 8:09 pm posted by Bon Ellingboe

    Find Andy and Megg a house

    Report
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